Why I Really Like This Book
These are podcasts about forgotten fiction, for curious readers, and for anyone who likes old books. Sometimes they're stories, sometimes they're not. Most of the authors write in English; and sometimes they don't. But all the books I talk about, I really really like. I hope you will too.
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My name is Kate Macdonald: I'm an English lecturer, and a lifelong browser in second-hand bookshops. I post weekly ten-minute podcasts on a Friday, on the books I really like which I think deserve new readers. You can find out lots more at the Facebook page here, and get these podcasts weekly by subscribing on the iTunes link above.

The music for the podcast intro is by The Tribe Band. Lucy Marsh did the drawing and Matthias Opsomer lettered it. Patrick Belk and Martin Fowler hold my tech safety net.

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Questions? Send me a message by mailing me at kate [dot] brussels [at] yahoo [dot] com.

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Fiendish plots, deadly traps, poison delivered by centipede, psychotropic fungi and man-eating mushrooms. Sax Rohmer invents lots of very intricate ways to kill people, delivered by Fu Manchu with contempt for the bumbling Nayland Smith and Dr Petrie who struggle to beat his dastardly ways. For readers who can ignore primitive and appalling racism in the pursuit of jaw-dropping plots. 

Direct download: Sax_Rohmer_and_Fu_Manchu_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:nemesis and revenge -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Hang out with the frivolous young things of 1913 in a novel that's half Victorian epigram and half modernist stream of consciousness. Dodo's day is not yet over, as she's about to begin her third marriage, while her discontented daughter Nadine is making a mess of even beginning her first. Why does she have to get married anyway? From the author of Mapp and Lucia, starring a very early version of Georgie Pillson.

Direct download: E_F_Benson_and_Dodos_Daughter_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:always amusing -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Bursley businessman takes on London snobbery about provincials and amateurs to build a theatre and run it for profit. Arnold Bennett's The Regent is sparkling, dogged, deeply satisfying, and a penetrating portrait of an Edwardian society that's too big for its boots.

Direct download: Arnold_Bennett_and_The_Regent_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:the life of the place -- posted at: 5:30 AM
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Oh, the awful fate of slithering down the social slope and losing one's class, one's home, one's respectability, but never one's honour. The public school morals of England are given pathos in Rose Macaulay's The Lee Shore, where true happiness is found with a donkey. For cautious art lovers.

Direct download: Rose_Macaulay_and_The_Lee_Shore_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:thinking too much -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Core sampling from the world of book publishing and book festivals in the 30th year of the Edinburgh Book Festival. With extra coverage of The Sorries at The Fringe.

Direct download: 2013_Edinburgh_Book_Festival.mp3
Category:people-watching -- posted at: 2:00 PM
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Hugh Walpole's Fortitude is a weighty epic of London literary life, Cornish Gothic, Victorian anarchists and the necessity of a public school background for getting on in life. it also contains the kindest boarding house written in the Edwardian period. For readers who like a long book to go with their comfy chair.

Direct download: Hugh_Walpole_and_Fortitude_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:people-watching -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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The totally forgotten author Una L Silberrad and her totally wonderful historical novel of 1913, Keren of Lowbole: witchcraft, alchemy, theology, attempted adultery, a heroine more interested in being a scientist than a housewife, and the mysterious affair of the bottle of plague. For chemists.

Direct download: Una_L_Silberrad_and_Keren_of_Lowbole_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:nemesis and revenge -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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When the German Empire invaded the British Empire's homeland, the British either scuttled off to Delhi, to live out their tragic, dispossessed lives in tea plantations where they could salute the Union Jack in safety, or stayed at home, supine under the Geman yoke. Saki's When William Came is brilliant pre-First World War satire, for readers who prefer a bock in the mornings.

Direct download: Saki_and_When_William_Came_-_Novels_from_1913.mp3
Category:always amusing -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Join perplexed lawyer Edward Leithen in John Buchan's The Power-House as he battles assassination attempts in central London, and avoids kidnap by building site, just because he's made the connection between a fleeing diplomat-adventurer in Russia and an international criminal conspiracy to destroy western civilisation. The first modern thriller from the author of The Thirty-Nine Steps.

Direct download: John_Buchan_and_The_Power-House_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:thrills and spills -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Trent's Last Case is a very modern Edwardian detective novel, with a Bohemian setting, the police in a cosy relationship with the media, and a cracking good mystery to solve ahead of the artist-journalist-detective hero. 

Direct download: E_C_Bentley_and_Trents_Last_Case_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:detective fiction -- posted at: 11:30 PM
Comments[1]