Why I Really Like This Book
These are podcasts about forgotten fiction, for curious readers, and for anyone who likes old books. Sometimes they're stories, sometimes they're not. Most of the authors write in English; and sometimes they don't. But all the books I talk about, I really really like. I hope you will too.
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My name is Kate Macdonald: I'm an English lecturer, and a lifelong browser in second-hand bookshops. I post weekly ten-minute podcasts on a Friday, on the books I really like which I think deserve new readers. You can find out lots more at the Facebook page here, and get these podcasts weekly by subscribing on the iTunes link above.

The music for the podcast intro is by The Tribe Band. Lucy Marsh did the drawing and Matthias Opsomer lettered it. Patrick Belk and Martin Fowler hold my tech safety net.

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Questions? Send me a message by mailing me at kate [dot] brussels [at] yahoo [dot] com.

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On Tuesday 24 June 2014 I'll be / will have been one of the interviewees on a BBC Radio Three programme called Free Thinking, discussing John Buchan's novel The Thirty-Nine Steps and its relationship to the First World War. I am a bit of an expert on Buchan, one does admit, so it's nice to be part of a BBC conversation about him. You can find the programme online at this link, and probably also as a podcast for a long time afterwards too.  BBC R3 Free Thinking The Thirty-Nine Steps

Category:extra information -- posted at: 12:14 PM
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Watch the First World War happen to a small village in Essex, and the household of Mr Britling, Everyman pundit and writer, with a son and friend who have just joined up, and very mixed feelings about what this awful war was for anyway. Published in 1916 when nobody knew what would happen, and fearing the worst was too likely, Mr Britling Sees It Through by H G Wells is an outstanding novel of reportage, reflection and empathic invention. For readers who like thier history on the edge of their comfy seat.

Direct download: H_G_Wells_and_Mr_Britling_-_Stuff_That_Really_Happened_4.mp3
Category:people-watching -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Due to mechanical failure, the sun in my eyes, and a distracting essay-marking deadline, I released the Hemingway post immediately, today, rather than on 30 May, when it was supposed to be. Now I don't know whether I should restart the fortnightly podcasting schedule from today, or leave a three-week gap to get back to where I should have been. Oh dear, oh dear ...

Category:general -- posted at: 11:41 AM
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Go fishing with Ernest Hemingway's novel Islands in the Stream and catch big man's stuff, like bonito, and U-boats, and bodies. Marvel at prose so pared down that it's just core, all peel flung out to sea for fish bait. For readers who like their stories well boned and gruff voiced.

Direct download: Ernest_Hemingway_and_Islands_in_the_Stream.mp3
Category:the great outdoors -- posted at: 8:59 AM
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The History Podcasters got together recently to record a collage edition on the theme of Terrible Leaders. You can hear all three collage programmes (each 30 minutes long) on www.historypodcasters.com. This is the segment from Why I Really Like This Book, on Nancy Mitford's outrageous and suppressed novel Wigs on the Green, in which she sent up her horrible brother-in-law Sir Oswald Mosley something rotten. For those who like laughing at fascists.

Direct download: Sir_Oswald_Mosley__Nancy_Mitford_-_Terrible_Leaders_1.mp3
Category:always amusing -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Dornford Yates's first two novels - Anthony Lyveden and Valerie French - were about the awful fate of the gentleman ex-officer who had to earn his living in domestic service. More melodrama comes from an enchanted forest and employers from the lower classes. There's a tortured love story too. For readers who like their noblesse obliged in strong doses.

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Why I can't recommend Sapper's The Black Gang, and why I'm taking a short break.

Direct download: end_of_1922_series.mp3
Category:extra information -- posted at: 11:00 PM
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The Adventures of Sally is set in 1920s New York, London, the stage and the French Riviera, after she inherits a fortune. Also starring several besotted young men, a lousy boxer, two devious leading ladies, and a pompous brother. A little-known gem by P G Wodehouse. For dog-lovers and clever young ladies.

Direct download: P_G_Wodehouse_and_The_Adventures_of_Sally_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:always amusing -- posted at: 12:30 AM
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Social tyranny in a small town, in E F Benson's novel of low cunning and outrageous scheming, Miss Mapp. For readers who play bridge for blood.

Direct download: E_F_Benson_and_Miss_Mapp_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:always amusing -- posted at: 12:30 AM
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It's the late 17th century, and Lady Otterby's spendthrift husband is betraying his friends and spending any money he can borrow as if honour was going out of fashion. Una L Silberrad's The Honest Man is a sober City merchant who will ride calmly into their lives to pick up the pieces, and let the rest go to the dogs. Splendid historical fiction set in Cumbria.

Direct download: Una_L_Silberrad_and_The_Honest_Man_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:strong women -- posted at: 12:30 AM
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