Why I Really Like This Book
These are podcasts about forgotten fiction, for curious readers, and for anyone who likes old books. Sometimes they're stories, sometimes they're not. Most of the authors write in English; and sometimes they don't. But all the books I talk about, I really really like. I hope you will too.
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My name is Kate Macdonald: I'm an English lecturer, and a lifelong browser in second-hand bookshops. I post weekly ten-minute podcasts on a Friday, on the books I really like which I think deserve new readers. You can find out lots more at the Facebook page here, and get these podcasts weekly by subscribing on the iTunes link above.

The music for the podcast intro is by The Tribe Band. Lucy Marsh did the drawing and Matthias Opsomer lettered it. Patrick Belk and Martin Fowler hold my tech safety net.

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Questions? Send me a message by mailing me at kate [dot] brussels [at] yahoo [dot] com.

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Dornford Yates's first two novels - Anthony Lyveden and Valerie French - were about the awful fate of the gentleman ex-officer who had to earn his living in domestic service. More melodrama comes from an enchanted forest and employers from the lower classes. There's a tortured love story too. For readers who like their noblesse obliged in strong doses.

Comments[1]

Why I can't recommend Sapper's The Black Gang, and why I'm taking a short break.

Direct download: end_of_1922_series.mp3
Category:extra information -- posted at: 11:00 PM
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The Adventures of Sally is set in 1920s New York, London, the stage and the French Riviera, after she inherits a fortune. Also starring several besotted young men, a lousy boxer, two devious leading ladies, and a pompous brother. A little-known gem by P G Wodehouse. For dog-lovers and clever young ladies.

Direct download: P_G_Wodehouse_and_The_Adventures_of_Sally_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:always amusing -- posted at: 12:30 AM
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Social tyranny in a small town, in E F Benson's novel of low cunning and outrageous scheming, Miss Mapp. For readers who play bridge for blood.

Direct download: E_F_Benson_and_Miss_Mapp_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:always amusing -- posted at: 12:30 AM
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It's the late 17th century, and Lady Otterby's spendthrift husband is betraying his friends and spending any money he can borrow as if honour was going out of fashion. Una L Silberrad's The Honest Man is a sober City merchant who will ride calmly into their lives to pick up the pieces, and let the rest go to the dogs. Splendid historical fiction set in Cumbria.

Direct download: Una_L_Silberrad_and_The_Honest_Man_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:strong women -- posted at: 12:30 AM
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Secrets and politics and multiple kidnappings at the League of Nations, and some pointed messages about early feminism. Rose Macaulay's Mystery at Geneva is a fine satirical novel in the mystery mode. (NB this version replaces the inadvertently gigantic version released earlier.)

Direct download: Rose_Macaulay_and_Mystery_at_Geneva_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:detective fiction -- posted at: 7:53 AM
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It's got hidden jewels, a princess who can run a mile, teenage military commanders, and the rejevenation of a retired grocer. Huntingtower is John Buchan's most delightful and exhilarating outdoor novel of kidnapping and rescue. 

Direct download: John_Buchan_and_Huntingtower_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:the great outdoors -- posted at: 12:30 AM
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In a wet and cold February, do you ever dream of escaping to a small Italian castle for sunshine and wisteria? Join four unhappy ladies who are longing for the right kind of love, and watch them unfold in Elizabeth von Arnim’s Enchanted April: one of the happiest reads of the 1920s.

Direct download: Elizabeth_von_Arnim_and_Enchanted_April_-_Novels_of_1922.mp3
Category:simply heaven -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Fiendish plots, deadly traps, poison delivered by centipede, psychotropic fungi and man-eating mushrooms. Sax Rohmer invents lots of very intricate ways to kill people, delivered by Fu Manchu with contempt for the bumbling Nayland Smith and Dr Petrie who struggle to beat his dastardly ways. For readers who can ignore primitive and appalling racism in the pursuit of jaw-dropping plots. 

Direct download: Sax_Rohmer_and_Fu_Manchu_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:nemesis and revenge -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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Hang out with the frivolous young things of 1913 in a novel that's half Victorian epigram and half modernist stream of consciousness. Dodo's day is not yet over, as she's about to begin her third marriage, while her discontented daughter Nadine is making a mess of even beginning her first. Why does she have to get married anyway? From the author of Mapp and Lucia, starring a very early version of Georgie Pillson.

Direct download: E_F_Benson_and_Dodos_Daughter_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:always amusing -- posted at: 11:30 PM
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