Why I Really Like This Book (nemesis and revenge)
These are podcasts about forgotten fiction, for curious readers, and for anyone who likes old books. Sometimes they're stories, sometimes they're not. Most of the authors write in English; and sometimes they don't. But all the books I talk about, I really really like. I hope you will too.
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My name is Kate Macdonald: I'm an English lecturer, and a lifelong browser in second-hand bookshops. I post weekly ten-minute podcasts on a Friday, on the books I really like which I think deserve new readers. You can find out lots more at the Facebook page here, and get these podcasts weekly by subscribing on the iTunes link above.

The music for the podcast intro is by The Tribe Band. Lucy Marsh did the drawing and Matthias Opsomer lettered it. Patrick Belk and Martin Fowler hold my tech safety net.

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Questions? Send me a message by mailing me at kate [dot] brussels [at] yahoo [dot] com.

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Fiendish plots, deadly traps, poison delivered by centipede, psychotropic fungi and man-eating mushrooms. Sax Rohmer invents lots of very intricate ways to kill people, delivered by Fu Manchu with contempt for the bumbling Nayland Smith and Dr Petrie who struggle to beat his dastardly ways. For readers who can ignore primitive and appalling racism in the pursuit of jaw-dropping plots. 

Direct download: Sax_Rohmer_and_Fu_Manchu_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:nemesis and revenge -- posted at: 1:30am CET
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The totally forgotten author Una L Silberrad and her totally wonderful historical novel of 1913, Keren of Lowbole: witchcraft, alchemy, theology, attempted adultery, a heroine more interested in being a scientist than a housewife, and the mysterious affair of the bottle of plague. For chemists.

Direct download: Una_L_Silberrad_and_Keren_of_Lowbole_-_Novels_of_1913.mp3
Category:nemesis and revenge -- posted at: 1:30am CET
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Rudyard Kipling's jointly written novel with a writer we've all forgotten is really very good. The Naulakha may be spelt wrong (Kipling's fault) but its a gripping mix of Victorian adventure and trouncing of feminist aspirations, set in a very corrupt Indian kingdom. For readers whose plans go awry.

Direct download: Rudyard_Kipling_and_The_Naulahka_-_Really_Randoms_3.mp3
Category:nemesis and revenge -- posted at: 1:30am CET
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A late period Rosemary Sutcliff novel, The Lantern-Bearers is set when the Roman Empire has pulled out of Britain, and there is no-one to hold back the Saxon hordes except the Roman-trained Aurelius Ambrosianus, and his nephew Arthur. A novel about what might have been Arthur's boyhood, and the beginnings of the Round Table.

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Read all about the power of the Edwardian newspaper in this short story about bullying, corruption, the abuse of power, and the defeat of small-mindedness. Rudyard Kipling's 'The Village That Voted The Earth Was Flat' is a lesson in collusion and taking revenge.

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