Why I Really Like This Book
These are podcasts about forgotten fiction, for curious readers, and for anyone who likes old books. Sometimes they're stories, sometimes they're not. Most of the authors write in English; and sometimes they don't. But all the books I talk about, I really really like. I hope you will too.
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My name is Kate Macdonald: I'm an English lecturer, and a lifelong browser in second-hand bookshops. I post weekly ten-minute podcasts on a Friday, on the books I really like which I think deserve new readers. You can find out lots more at the Facebook page here, and get these podcasts weekly by subscribing on the iTunes link above.

The music for the podcast intro is by The Tribe Band. Lucy Marsh did the drawing and Matthias Opsomer lettered it. Patrick Belk and Martin Fowler hold my tech safety net.

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Questions? Send me a message by mailing me at kate [dot] brussels [at] yahoo [dot] com.

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One of the most under-rated, and one of the best writers of Golden Age Detection, Josephine Tey, tells us a dark little tale about how Miss Pym's psychology can detect a murder in a gymnasium, in a hothouse single-sex environment, where desperation that the best job goes to the best person causes passions to spill out from the tightly buttoned blouses of perfect English gym teachers. A magnificent, Machiavellian murder in the cleanest surroundings. For those who prefer working on the mat to the high bars.

Direct download: Josephine_Tey_and_Miss_Pym_Disposes.mp3
Category:detective fiction -- posted at: 1:30am CET
Comments[1]

Another 1930s detective novel about drugs, but with more variety: not just cocaine, but cigarettes and the subjugation of the masses' free will by advertising. Dorothy L Sayers feeds her public's addiction for more Lord Peter Wimsey with Murder Must Advertise, a great novel about murder and treachery in the office lives of advertising executives and high diving in high society. For those who prefer a Daimler to a Ford.

Direct download: Dorothy_L_Sayers_and_Murder_Must_Advertise.mp3
Category:detective fiction -- posted at: 1:30am CET
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Before he wrote The Sword in the Stone, T H White tried to gatecrash the 1930s party of detective novelists critiqueing their own society. He tackled drugs, murder, snobbery, loyalty, fast cars and literary allusion. He played with the conventions of the detective novel and produced a small but perfect classic of detective fiction. For readers who prefer to ride their horses astride.

Direct download: T_H_White_and_Darkness_at_Pemberley.mp3
Category:detective fiction -- posted at: 1:30am CET
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It's not a novel, but it's great political reportage and polemic. In The Road to Wigan Pier Orwell takes us into scenes of 20th-century degradation and poverty that were commonplace, and inescapable, for hundreds of thousands of the British before the Second World War. He gets angry about waste and mismanagement, petty meanness and middle-class squeamishness. He is resentful at the public-school system for giving him complexes about the smell of the poor, and he's furious at the misery children grow up in if their fathers can't get work. For readers who want something to get angry about.

Direct download: BPF_5_Orwell.mp3
Category:the life of the place -- posted at: 1:30am CET
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